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Silicosis treatment breakthrough at Prince Charles  University Hospital.

Silicosis treatment breakthrough at Prince Charles University Hospital.

Silicosis treatment breakthrough at Prince Charles University Hospital
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Johnson & Johnson cancer  appeal fails.

Johnson & Johnson cancer appeal fails.

Silicosis treatment break through at Prince Charles University Hospital
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Spring 2020 Newsletter.

Spring 2020 Newsletter.

Silicosis treatment break through at Prince Charles University Hospital
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Cover for Asbestos Disease Support Society
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Asbestos Disease Support Society

Asbestos Disease Support Society

Asbestos Disease Support Society (ADSS)

~~In the News~~Courier Mail - 6 August 2022Residents are filthy: ‘Our town’s a dump’RESIDENTS are sick, struggling to breathe and facing “asbestos contamination” from mountains of rubbish dumped in their communities after devastating New South Wales and Queensland floods. More than 216,000 tonnes of waste was transported to Ipswich – which was itself smashed by floodwaters and parts of NSW, after the latest deluge. It comes amid calls for more landfill infrastructure, as Australia stares down the barrel of increasing extreme weather events. Ipswich Residents Against Toxic Environment (IRATE) president Jim Dodrill said that city had become a proverbial dumping ground for Queensland, accepting 42 per cent of the state’s waste alone. He said 4500 odour-related complaints had been registered since March 2022. “We can no longer continue to be a dumping ground for the nation’s rubbish,” he said, adding landfill sites in proximity of urban areas was not sustainable. “Like the residents in Lismore, our community was hit hard by recent flooding but we have had to take Brisbane’s rubbish as well as those people living in Northern New South Wales. “The volumes of waste coming into the area are larger than they have ever been and unbeknown to many Australians is that Ipswich annually takes the septic waste from the Splendour in the Grass festival which was recently rained out.” Ipswich Mayor Theresa Harding said a public inquiry was needed into the health impacts of the landfill. “Odour issues that have been experienced in Ipswich for years from landfills in both well-established suburbs of Ipswich and newer developments,” Cr Harding said. Residents of the western Sydney suburb of Eastern Creek have been confined indoors to avoid a rubbish smell akin to rotten eggs. Waste and Recycling Queensland chief executive Dr Georgina Davis said there was an urgent need for more landfill sites capable of handling hazardous and general waste. “There’s a very limited number of landfills in Queensland and northern New South Wales capable of handling hazardous waste for example,” she said. “Asbestos contamination has also impeded waste recovery along with the types of items collected such as mattresses and sofas which are difficult to recycle, requiring high levels of manual input and with limited end markets for the recovered foams. “With the frequency of future climate and disaster events expected to increase, serious consideration around the future infrastructure needed to recycle and dispose of the wastes generated is overdue.” ... See MoreSee Less
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By becoming a member of ADSS you will receive ongoing information and support. You will be kept informed of any developments around asbestos issues and invited to events hosted by the Society.

ADSS holds exciting member events
over the calendar year to raise money
to support sufferers and raise
awareness of our cause.
For more information ….

Becoming a corporate member of the
ADSS demonstrates an organisation’s
commitment to its community.
Please contact us regarding
corporate membership.

ADSS is a support organisation which
relies upon donations and grants to assist
sufferers of Asbestos Disease,
their families, friends and carers.

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